The Government of Papua New Guinea, through its Climate Change Development Authority, supports the development of a transparent and effective REDD+ mechanism that benefits the people of Papua New Guinea.

 

    

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Why is REDD + important to Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea has one of the most significant areas of largely intact tropical forest in the world, although these forests appear to be facing acute and imminent threats. Forests are a vital resource for the local population particularly in the remote rural areas of Papua New Guinea, providing food, fiber, building materials, and support a variety of wildlife and ecosystem services. The Papua New Guinea Forest Authority estimates that 80% of the total area of the country is covered by natural forests, of which 52% are considered production forests (for timber and other products), and 48% are for conservation (not for timber extraction due to inaccessibility or ecological constraints).

The country’s forests are important to the country’s economy, with forest industries contributing approximately 380 million Kina per year to the government and landowners through tax, permits and royalties. However, deforestation and forest degradation related to forest industries and other activities have resulted in the depletion of these important benefits and released significant green house gas emissions. Sustainable management of the country’s forest resources is crucial for reducing global emissions as well as helping to ensure forest resources are available for future generations in Papua New Guinea.

                                                                                                                                                                                          

How does REDD+ PNG work?

 

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List of relevant policy’s to go here with links to documents

 

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Papua New Guinea's progress in development of REDD+

Papua New Guinea has one of the most significant areas of largely intact tropical forest in the world, although these forests appear to be facing acute and imminent threats. Forests are a vital resource for the local population particularly in the remote rural areas of Papua New Guinea, providing food, fiber, building materials, and support a variety of wildlife and ecosystem services. The Papua New Guinea Forest Authority estimates that 80% of the total area of the country is covered by natural forests, of which 52% are considered production forests (for timber and other products), and 48% are for conservation (not for timber extraction due to inaccessibility or ecological constraints).

The country’s forests are important to the country’s economy, with forest industries contributing approximately 380 million Kina per year to the government and landowners through tax, permits and royalties. However, deforestation and forest degradation related to forest industries and other activities have resulted in the depletion of these important benefits and released significant green house gas emissions. Sustainable management of the country’s forest resources is crucial for reducing global emissions as well as helping to ensure forest resources are available for future generations in Papua New Guinea.

The Government of Papua New Guinea has committed to achieving sustainable development by designing national strategies and policies including Vision 2050, the National Strategy for Responsible Sustainable Development for Papua New Guinea (2014), the Papua New Guinea Development Strategic Plan 2010-2030 and the National Climate Change Action Plan (2010). These plans set out ambitious targets for the protection of forests and the management of green house gas emissions. REDD+ can help with achieving these objectives. With a combination of domestic action and international support, REDD+ can help Papua New Guinea to achieve these goals and balance the need for economic and human development with environmental sustainability.

                                                                                                                                                                                          

What more needs to be done?

There are four design elements of the national framework to implement REDD+ under UNFCCC. The Government of Papua New Guinea, in partnership with international donors including the UN-REDD Programme, the FCPF, Japan International Cooperation Agency and the European Union have started to build capacity and knowledge around these to help PNG develop and implement a national approach to REDD+. Further work on each element is still needed and will be the focus of efforts by development partners and the Government of Papua New Guinea through the Climate Change Development Authority and Papua New Guinea Forestry Authority.

  1. National REDD+ Strategy

    For Papua New Guinea to implement REDD+ under the UNFCCC requires development and implementation of a National REDD+ Strategy or action plan that ensures the full and effective participation of all relevant stakeholders. The National REDD+ Strategy or action plan should outline the country’s vision and objectives for REDD+ and how these will support national development priorities. The National REDD+ Strategy or action plan should provide information on the four core design elements of REDD+ and a clear plan for how REDD+ will be implemented. What is happening now? PNG is currently in the process of developing its The National REDD+ Strategy and Action plan.


  2. Forest Reference Emission Level

    Papua New Guinea is required to develop a Forest Reference Emission Level. This represents the expected evolution of GHG emissions from the forest sector in the absence of REDD+. What is happening now? Papua New Guinea Forest Authority, with support from the UN-REDD Programme and the European Union is working to develop the country’s Forest Reference Emission Level with a target for completion by the end of 2016. The work involves assessing changes in forest cover since 2000. This work is linked to the National Forest Monitoring System and the National Forest Inventory.


  3. National Forest Monitoring System

    A National Forest Monitoring System provides transparent information on the status of forests in a country. It has two core functions:

    • To monitor changes within a country’s forests: this will help improve forest management and planning; and
    • To measure, report and verify (MRV) levels of GHG emissions from forests.

    The NFMS will generate data and reports on PNG’s GHG emissions from forests that will be sent to the UNFCCC and form the basis for results-based payments from the international community.What is happening now?The Government of Papua New Guinea, in partnership with the UN- REDD Programme and JICA, is developing systems to map and monitor the country’s forests – “Terra PNG” (managed by CCDA) and the National Forest Monitoring Portal (managed by PNGFA). This information will be linked with ground- based forest measurements through the National Forest Inventory.


  4. Safeguard Information System

    There are seven REDD+ Safeguards that have been agreed under the UNFCCC to ensure REDD+ actions ‘do no harm’ and to promote positive environmental, social and economic benefits. Countries are required to show that they have addressed and respected these safeguards, through the development of a Safeguards Information System. The Safeguards Information System can vary in their complexity and scale but should provide information that is comprehensive, accessible and up to date.

    What is happening now?

    Papua New Guinea has taken initial steps in reviewing existing policies, laws and regulations to identify how well they cover the REDD+ safeguards. The FCPF project, through UNDP, is supporting Papua New Guinea with this work and with developing a framework for REDD+ safeguards including identifying the steps needed to develop the Safeguards Information System.